Formula in Buddhism First Vow Part 3

Formula in Buddhism

 

First Vow - Part 3

You see the formula here when we learn the Teaching of Buddha. It goes as follows:
1. To Learn Buddhism is to learn myself:
2. To learn myself is to learn Buddha’s Compassion:
3. To learn Compassion is to forget myself,
4. And to throw myself into Buddha’s World.

The 1st Vow
Each Vow appears to me to clarify what I am. This is the way Dharma or Truth appears to me. The 1st Vow in the Larger Sutra says,

“ If in my country, after obtaining Buddhahood,
there should be hell, a land of hungry ghosts, or brute creatures,
may I not achieve the Highest Enlightenment.”

My country: The World of Purity or Pure Land
Buddhahood: The world showing Dharma or Truth fully
Hell: Result of my anger
Hungry ghost: Result of my greed
Brute creature: Result of my ignorance
Note: Anger, greed, and ignorance are called “Three Evils” or “Three Poisons”
which damage me and others in many ways. You may regard them as Primal Colors in your mind which create any colors such as envy, jealousy, selfishness, and so on.

Highest Enlightenment: Perfect Wisdom and Compassion

The Vow talks to me - I get angry because I possess anger, not because of someone’s fault. I get greedy because of greed in my mind. I get lost because I have no ability to view and understand anything as it is. I come to know me thanks to the 1st Vow; I am the man who possesses the three of them (anger, greed, ignorance) perfectly until the very moment I die. So I am ready for anything in my life time. This is the way Dharma appears.

You look up the sky at night. You can see no light there, but see stars and the moon shinning. The light clarifies the stars and the noon. That is the way you recognize the light at dark night. In the same way I come to know the existence of Wisdom or Light when I come to know what I am.

To learn Buddhism is to learn myself: I learn myself by and through Wisdom of Buddha.

In Gassho,

Rev E.D. Fujii

 

 

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